We are now into our third year of exchanging postcards amongst our small but hardy group. Take the time to browse around and see how we are inspired by one another to keep our creative juices flowing.

January-February
March-April
Postcards for Vicki
May-June

January-February

The January-February postcards were inspired by the following image:

This “screaming zebra” definitely brought our creative wild sides….

Kim

Here is Kim’s interpretation of the January-February theme:

In Kim’s words:

I wasn’t daring enough to go near the zebra itself, although I will admit, the mouth and teeth were tempting. I chickened out and focused on the stripes. Now, the first question is always are the stripes black on white or
white on black. I let my stash speak to that. I have been using batik lately and had a piece that I thought would make a neat background….really is the zebra black or is it more brown black???

Working with a simple design can be very effective, that is what I decided to keep in mind…

I decided to use some white Oliver twists. With the range of different threads, I thought using some different stitches with these would make a nice representation of the stripes. Coral stitch, chain stitch, split stitch, outline, French knots were some of the stitches used to give more variety, as each stripe has its own character. Some stitches created the stripes, while others were used to anchor the ribbon or thread to the batik.

This was a lot of fun!

Sharon

Here is Sharon’s interpretation of the January-February theme:

In Sharon’s words:

The zebra was a lot of fun to interpret. I used a high contrast, navy blue and white background fabric. Then I placed a used dryer sheet on top. Next, I drew a zebra with a Sharpie on the dryer sheet and puffed up the dryer sheet for a three-dimensional effect. I pinned the dryer sheet to the base fabric and embroidered the outline of a zebra on to the sandwich. Next, I inserted strands of shiny mylar shreds into the fabric sandwich and embroidered the grass and quit-stitched the entire surface. Finally, I cut holes into the dryer sheet to reveal some of the contrasting background and serged the edges.

Sue

Here is Sue’s interpretation of the January-February theme:

In Sue’s words:

When I first looked at this image I was really torn, I wanted to reproduce the Zebra, but I also wanted to depict the Zebra Crossing (In England we call cross walks, Zebra crossings).

I also knew it was time to do some real stitching and canvas work was what kept coming to the front of my mind.

So as you can see I made a Zebra on a Zebra Crossing. I enjoyed stitching him and looking for different stitches that would give the effects I was after.

The one mistake I made was the backing, I usually use light coloured fabric and wrote on it with a permanent marker. This time I used white felt, I had the idea to also stitch on the back, that didn’t happen and the felt was impossible to write on.

Hope he is happy in his new home.

Seanagh

Here is Seanagh’s interpretation of the January-February theme:

In Seanagh’s words:

Any zebra I have ever seen always looks fat and sleek and healthy, even if it is dusty and the middle of a drought, so it was the lovely sleek skin that took my eye (although who couldn’t love that smile!). I worked on a piece of tea-dyed fine linen, isolating a section of the stripes that I found interesting and used a very fine permanent marker to first sketch and then stitch the stripes. I liked the way a little of warmth of colour came in as it rose up his neck to the mane, so decided to keep that at the top left hand corner.

Joyce

Here is Joyce’s interpretation of the January-February theme:

In Joyce’s words:

I really loved this zebra from the minute I saw the photo. It took a while to work out what to do with her though. i decided to focus on the stripes which I stitched in herringbone Stitch on a background of white linen. I added a realistic eye with lovely flowing eyelashes. They’re a bit ruffled here but after they are combed and even curled she could pose for Cover Girl.

Eleanor

Here is Eleanor’s interpretation of the January-February theme:

In Eleanor’s words:

When I saw the zebra picture I immediately thought of the zebra-like striped fabric in my stash.

The pencil thin white stripes were stitched with a straight stitch on the sewing machine using white iridescent Sulky Sliver Metallic. The rest of the white stripes are hand embroidered in various embroidery stitches and threads. The black stripes were to be embroidered with black threads. However, I learned quickly that the black on black did not show up at all. To overcome that I used black metallic threads and that did make the black stitches a bit more visible. The white threads on the white background do seem to show up quite well but probably because the white stripes are not a pure white. And then I kept thinking that this is not going to photograph well at all. But surprisingly enough the stitches do show up in the photograph. The red accents are to add interest and were done in abstract shapes in keeping with the abstract background. The edges were finished with bias of the fabric because I love to see striped fabric on the bias.

This was a good learning experience and I really enjoyed doing it.

Deb

Here is Deb’s interpretation of the January-February theme:

In Deb’s words:

For some reason I was compelled to avoid black and white, and found inspiration in fabrics I uncovered while looking for something else. The linen ground was built up in about five layers, the top layer in a stripy pattern and stitched in place with oversized stitches. The zebra image was traced on paper, then laid on the fabric and free machined following the traced lines. It was my intention to just leave the machined outline of the zebra on the surface but soon realized that for the image to be clearer I needed to cut away whatever layers were not necessary. That’s when I wished I had chosen a different ground fabric. Ah well, live and learn.

So, my question to Kim was, and to paraphrase Shakespeare I think, would a zebra in any other colour smell as sweet?! Enjoy!

Mary Anne

Here is Mary Anne’s interpretation of the January-February theme:

In Mary Anne’s words:

I tried to get a “tribal” African theme – hence the geometrical border in black, orange, yellow, red. And I think we have all agreed that this wonderful zebra is laughing, so I had to include the “Ha, Ha, Ha”. I worked in cotton embroidery floss on cream linen using chain, slip and stemstitch, stylizing the zebra design, with a bit of couched cord for his tail. I stitched the message on the reverse.

And then at the end of all of this I came across this little poem from Shel Silverstein:- the card was too small to include it too, so here it is for your enjoyment.

Zebra Question

I asked the zebra,
Are you black with white strips?
Or white with black strips?
And the zebra asked me,
Are you good with bad habits?
Or are you bad with good habits?
Are you noisy with quiet times?
Or are you quiet with noisy times?
Are you happy with sad days?
Or are you sad with happy days?
Are you neat with some sloppy ways?
Or are you sloppy with some neat ways?
And on and on and on and on
And on and on he went.
I’ll never ask a zebra
About stripes
Again.

Pat

Here is Pat’s interpretation of the January-February theme:

In Pat’s words:

I have been taking drawing classes at one of the high schools and I think that had a strong influence on my design. I was amused to read Deb’s comment that she was not using black and white as mine is almost exclusively black and white. The little bit of colour is in the teeth. Someone really must get those zebras some toothbrushes!

Anyhow the entire design is done just with straight stitches. I tried to keep the sketchy look to it. I hope you enjoy my version of the laughing zebra.

Carol

Here is Carol’s interpretation of the January-February theme:

In Carol’s words:

I love the combination of black and white. To me, it is quite dramatic. I also love bargello, and find that to be dramatic as well. As soon as I saw the zebra, I thought of bargello. My first attempt was to graph out the word “Zebra” and work bargello around it, but it only looked like a slightly wavy oval going around the letters in the word zebra. I had only tried it on paper, so no threads were wasted!

I decided to just do straight bargello instead. I took one of my favourite “wavy” patterns of bargello and worked from that. The centre stitches are worked over 4 threads, and then as I went outwards in the rows, I stitched over 5 threads, then 6 threads and then back to 5 and 4 threads again. This was in the hopes of capturing that some of the zebra’s body parts and stripes are thicker than other parts.

I had some black and white material (although not striped) that I used for the back of the postcard. To finish the postcard, I made 2 twisted cords, one in black, and one in black and white and attached them to the postcard. I then stitched the ends of them together and frayed the ends of them to portray a zebra’s tail!

Like the others, this was a fun postcard to do. I love doing these postcards.

Sandra

Here is Sandra’s interpretation of the January-February theme:

In Sandra’s words:

Firstly, I love “exotic” animals so the zebra was a real find. When I saw the title, I immediately thought of sound coming out of the zebra’s mouth. I knew I had some red sparkly felt that would make an awesome background. To create the zebra I used my a program on my computer that let’s me create a document the size of the postcard, then I moved the zebra around and played with the size until I liked the composition and printed it out. I traced the outline of the zebra onto white broadcloth and started stitching the black in long and short stitches in the direction of the hair. Then I stitched the white. I added a bit of grey into the ear and did turkey stitch for the main. (I probably could have starched it to give it the brush cut look but I only thought of that right now. 🙂 ) I trimmed the zebra roughly and stitched the outline onto the felt so I would know where the “scream” needed to be. I then used a glittery multicoloured metallic DMC in a chain stitch for the scream. I had envisioned it swirling out of his mouth. I fused the zebra onto double sided fusing, trimmed it closely and fused it onto the felt. I finished it all off with a blanket stitch border done in a red #12 pearl cotton.

This is one of my absolutely favourite pieces. I was excited to finish it and sorry to have to send it away. But he is in a good home.

Linda

Here is Linda’s interpretation of the January-February theme:

In Linda’s words:

This picture had so many possibilities that it was hard to choose just one idea and stick to it. After much deliberation, I chose to use some African tribal designs in black and white using Persian wool on canvas. I was also intrigued by the Zebra’s mane and did a mane at the top of the postcard using turkey stitch. I liked the stiffness of the Persian wool which seemed to look like the Zebra’s mane in the picture.

March-April

The March-April postcards were inspired by the following image:

With the spring weather comes a time of change and renewal. Some of us are motivated to give the house a big clean and purge. Others of us are embarking on new challenging. Still others have got trips planned to new destinations. In keeping with this feeling of spring renewal, we’re doing the same with our theme for March and April.

The theme for the next two months is self-portraits. We’ll all be creating postcards based on our images and what we “see” when we look in the mirror. A time to be truly creative and perhaps even a little reflective. Who knows what each of us will see when we look in the mirror? Time will only tell.

Deb

Here is Deb’s interpretation of the March-April theme:

In Deb’s words:

I depicted it in a literal sense, using an old photo and just altering the background. I took some artistic license and eliminated one of my chins, all of the grey hair and maybe a few pounds! Isn’t art wonderful?!

The technique was worked in full strands of DMC floss, in the style of Sue Dove, an English artist/weaver/embroiderer who has a painterly style to her work with big slashes of colour. It’s worked on double needlepoint canvas. She has a book, “Painting with Stitches” from Interweave Press in 2004 if you want to see more of her work. I really liked how it turned out and actually worked up fairly quickly once I had the colour palette chosen.

Kim

Here is Kim’s interpretation of the March-April theme:

In Kim’s words

Well, this was a challenge….. it is done and has been received. I decided to send it anyways as I always take a photo of them before I send them.

My first thought was how to get some Science into this…I thought chromosomes, nothing says “me” more that that ( my background is cytogenetics among others) I have to admit the ambition to create 46 of them was not that overwhelming.

I waited and thought more. I decided to have scrap book materials help out. That seemed to make things flow better.

I went with a green background with gold letters for my name. A few years ago, my colours were done. Both the green and gold tied. Green being the “what if” and gold being very organized.

I still liked the original idea of chromosomes so I added some loose threads to the green. I also couldn’t find many “scientific” things in the scrapbooking aisle.(what’s up with that?) The threads represent the way the DNA spends most of the time. I then added things such as golf, football, paint, brushes etc. for all the things I love and do. I even included a few things about school.

Hopefully it looks like a organized mess and leaves you wondering “what if?”.

Sue

Here is Sue’s interpretation of the March-April theme:

In Sue’s words:

I had planned to use some painted Lutadur but that didn’t look very good so I distressed some Dupioni silk with the embellisher and blended in some silk roving. I then added some cutout flowers , some happy face stickers and some inspirational stickers. Next I sewed circles from the centre out in bright colours and then wrote important things in my life at the moment. I then added some gold sliver thread in a circle pattern and decided I liked the effect.

The idea was to create an upbeat positive collage of things important to me. One of the most important things in my life is always being positive and looking for the good in situations, I thought I achieved that. Paul looked at it and said,” yes that’s you it looks like chaos!” You be the judge!

Eleanor

Here is Eleanor’s interpretation of the March-April theme:

In Eleanor’s words:

My self portrait is a collection of some of the things that are representative and important in my life.
This motto has hung on my kitchen wall for many years and it accurately describes how I feel at times!
I love the warmth of the sun and beauty of the stars. The scissors represent my love of needlework and the horse represents my love of horses which I rode in shows when I was much younger.
I have no real favourite color as represented by the multicoloured background. The background is painted on a left-over scrap of my wedding dress.

Pat

Here is Pat’s interpretation of the March-April theme:

In Pat’s words:

I took Deb at her word and I’m giving you a glimpse of me and what I think best represents me. So, sit back and enjoy the ride. I’ll list the items beginning at the top corner.

Sam represents my pets. I always have one and couldn’t live without them. They keep me company as I stitch and listen to all my tales of triumph and woe with never a judgement. Sam is plump and sleeps all the time so that is how he posed for me.

Next to Sam is a book. Jim and I have something over 10,000 in our home collection and for the last 30+ years I have worked in the book industry. They consume our house and my work day.

At the other top corner is a heart. This is for Jim, my husband of 28 years and my love and support. Jim is not a conventional person and so I thought he deserved something more than just a Valentine style heart. This is my idea of a rendering of an anatomically correct heart.

Below the heart is a chain linked together around my logo (p and a). The chain is my circle of family and friends that offer the best support that anyone could ask for.

Beside the chain is a black hole with a dollar sign. This, I’m sorry to say, is work at the moment. A black hole but it does provide the financial means for me to keep enjoying my lifestyle, and my crafts. There are bright moments and so it is not all black.

At the bottom is me. You only see me from the nose up as I am quite short and that seems to be what most people see. I feel like a kid looking over counters, computer screens, steering wheels, what have you. In front of my one eye is a needle as I feel I view the world through the eye of a needle.

All of this has been stitched with a variety of threads, some silks, some cottons. It was a lot of fun. Hard to be this honest with myself and difficult to stitch myself. I did use a photograph instead of a mirror. At least that was one level removed. If I had it to do over, the only change would be to add a TTC token as most of my stitching is done on the bus on my daily commute.

Carol

Here is Carol’s interpretation of the March-April theme:

In Carol’s words

After thinking about it for considerable time, I decided I would do an interpretation of ME surrounding activities for the months of March and April.

I have a turtle collection; I’m not sure how it all got started. So I decided to do my postcard in the shape of a turtle. You will note that it is made from blue jeans with a purple/teal top – my wardrobe of choice!

The eye is a snowflake button representing the huge amounts of snow we received. The smile is a dumbbell that represents my exercise program (a New Year’s resolution not yet broken)!

Our Guild did the Artist Trading Card exchange on behalf of the members of Embroiderers’ Association of Canada. Every day in early March was like Christmas when I came from work to a mail box full of little pieces of art, so I put a little gingerbread man charm to represent that. The jingle bell represents the Guild program we had in April making Christmas ornaments.

The dollar sign represents my job as a Pension Information Officer. The needle, of course, represents my stitching. I put in crossword style words showing that I am on Facebook and play word games with friends on there, and I was particularly happy when my name “fit in” to the puzzle!

The butterfly represents my friends, and the heart represents my family. The little turtle represents my grandbaby that’s due in August. This is my first grandchild, and in case you can’t tell, I am very excited!!

A fun postcard to do.

Mary Anne

Here is Mary Anne’s interpretation of the March-April theme:

In Mary Anne’s words:

I guess I could call this “Those were the Days!”

I printed an old black & white picture of my 21 yr-old self on to slubbed silk, helped the colouring along with some watercolour pencils to tint up some of the blonde bits which are now grey, a bit or surface stitching and a pearl for the ear-rings that were a gift on my 21st birthday; added some poignant lyrics from the old Beatles song “Will you still need me, will you still feed me when I’m 64”

I still have the one I REALLY wanted to do – my alter-ego with voluminous hair, long nails, flamboyantly coloured clothing, lots of “bling”, bright make-up and maybe even a cigarette holder (though that probably wouldn’t be politically correct if I was holding 4 grandchildren in the other arm!)

Joyce

Here is Joyce’s interpretation of the March-April theme:

In Joyce’s words:

The self portrait was one of the pieces that made me change my mind over and over. I finally settled on a Needle Nut. I used to own a needlework supply shop called “The Needle Nut” and this little lady was my logo. in the end I settled on bringing her to life again, mostly with felt appliqué. I guess I’ll always be just that, a needle nut!!

Seanagh

Here is Seanagh’s self-portrait postcard:

In Seanagh’s words:

I couldn’t get started on this postcard but eventually resorted to the “stitch what you see” method.  That had some interesting results, none of which were worthy of sending anywhere except the recycle bin!  The harder I tried to see, all my focus just seemed to end up with me staring at my eye in the mirror, so that is what I did … “brown eye, brown eye what do you see?  I see Seanagh looking at me” (too many years in the ‘learn to read’ program?)

The piece is really a mixed method/mixed media – some paint, some pencil crayon, some layering, some machine stitching and a little hand stitching.  I decided one’s eye gets quite anatomical-looking when one stares at it close up for too long!  So much for my initial idea which was to include some humour.

Linda

Here is Linda’s self-portrait postcard:

In Linda’s words:

I couldn’t figure out what I was going to do with this challenge for a long time. Then I remembered that Carol Storie had done a word search puzzle for Leslie Burrows’ postcard and I had my idea.

I jotted down some things about my life and made up a crossword puzzle using the answers. To make a little game of it, I put the answers in categories and provided one letter in the word. I put in my husband, sons and daughter-in-law as people who are very important to me, things I have enjoyed doing in the past and things I enjoy doing now, places I’ve lived and enjoyable jobs I’ve had. The Star of David represents my faith (Judaism) and the heart is for my family and friends. Of course, I had to have my favourite colour represented by the lilac background and purple metallic thread. The only stitch I used was the versatile straight stitch, which is not necessarily my favourite stitch, but was the best one for this postcard.

Postcards for Vicki

During the winter months, the intrepid group of Inspired Fibres creative stitchers got together and made postcards for me (Vicki). Many thanks for the postcards and for taking the time to gift me with your inspirations.

Here is the theme for the Postcards for Vicki:

When I’m not working on web sites such as this, I spend a lot of time racing my cyclo-cross bike through-out North America and Europe. (If you want to read about my bike racing life, visit Ottawa.cx)

Carol

Here is Carol’s interpretation of the Postcards for Vicki theme:

In Carol’s words:

I could describe the technique for each circle, but instead, here’s my wording on the postcard:

“Dear Vicki,
Thank you for putting our postcards on a webpage!
Representing the wheels of your bicycle, I made circles in different stitching techniques.
The green is to represent the grass, blue for the sky, and the multicolours are flowers. A sun in hopes that the sun will shine on you in your journies. And of course, a Saskatchewan Roughriders 100 Years of Pride loonie for a Saskatchewan girl!!”

Linda

Here is Linda’s interpretation of the Postcards for Vicki theme:

In Linda’s words:

Sending Vicki a postcard was a great idea to thank her for all the work she’s done on the website. Attached is my card for Vicki. I don’t remember what I wrote on the back, but here are my comments about the card:

When I saw the pictures of Vicki racing, I was struck by the colours of her uniform and used them for the background. The red became the racing track with the white lace representing the tapes laying out the course. I couched down black memory thread showing how the bike went through the course with the wheels getting bigger the closer they came to the end of the race.

I had a lot of fun doing this card and playing with the memory thread.

Sue

Here is Sue’s interpretation of the Postcards for Vicki theme:

In Sue’s words:

Here is the card I made for Vicki. Like Linda I can not remember what I wrote on the back. To make the card I painted a piece of Lutadur with silk paints, to get the blurry colours I wet the Lutadur before I applied the paints .

I then traced the image of Vicki and put it on the light box with the painted Lutadur on top and traced it again . I then found a piece of material to put behind the Lutadur as it was still a bit transparent that enhanced the front colours. I then drew the image with the machine. This was the first time I have tried this, not as easy as I thought it would be.

I was quite impressed that it still looked like Vicki though. The edges I used a satin stitch on the machine, stitched over a pearl cotton to make it rounder and more finished.

Pat

Here is Pat’s interpretation of the Postcards for Vicki theme:

In Pat’s words:

I tried a couple of times to draw Vicki racing but it wasn’t working. I thought to myself that I needed to simplify the design and so, the very simple lines. I did the bike in gray, Vicki in black (both in outline stitch) and the finish line as a spot of colour in orange done in . Holding it all together is a blue border done in coral knot stitch. Simple linear design. If I was to do it over again I might try to do something with the background to give the sense of speed but this is how it ended up.

Kim

Here is Kim’s interpretation of the Postcards for Vicki theme:

In Kim’s words:

Since I was working on mine at the holidays, I took that as the theme…..It was felted, just for something different. As some may recognize, it is similar to the card I designed and made that was sent overseas….

Joyce

Here is Joyce’s interpretation of the Postcards for Vicki theme:

In Joyce’s words:

I tried to show speed and depth in my interpretation of Vicki’s photo. The gold eyelet wheels spin between the couched orange ribbons on a fun fabric backdrop. This was a fun piece to stitch once I got the concept down.
Thank you for all your work Vicki!!

Deb

Here is Deb’s interpretation of the Postcards for Vicki theme:

In Deb’s words:

By the time I got around to creating Vicki’s postcard, we had had news that her health issues had sidelined her for a while. The feeling I wanted to impart in my card was that no matter how dark and bleak things appear, there is always a ray of hope somewhere. The message on the back of the card, if I recall correctly, was ‘only when the sky is darkest can you see the stars’, or something to that effect!

Anyway, the card was created with bands of silk paper with some free machining over the surface. The little figure of Vicki is made from Vilene, painted and then stitched on with metal thread.

Linda

Here is Linda’s interpretation of the Postcards for Vicki theme:

In Linda’s words:

I roughly painted the background and then embellished it with embroidery and beads.

My intent was to wish Vicki blue skies, green hills, fields full of flowers, a quiet country side and a road to herself. That is what I would like for myself should I ever cycle.

Eleanor

Here is Eleanor’s interpretation of the Postcards for Vicki theme:

In Eleanor’s words:

The background is painted fabric paper with cycling images inserted into the layers. It was then painted with a wash of copper metallic paint.

The bicycle wheel is black ultra suede with metallic thread used for the spokes. The handlebars are silver lame fabric bonded to the background.

May-June

Our May-June postcards were inspired by a beautiful bouquet of flowers:

Here is what Wenda has to say about this photo:
May/June speaks to me of flowers, especially after the long winter that we have just experienced. This is a bouquet a friend picked for me from her backyard last May and I thought it was so beautiful! I hope everyone is inspired by the colour and texture.

Looking forward to seeing your creative inspirations in full bloom!

Sue

Here is Sue’s interpretation of the May-June theme:

In Sue’s words:

This image had me thinking all kinds of flowers and all kinds of stitch techniques. I could not narrow down to, what to do. I finally decided to poke around in my stash and see what really spoke to me. In this process I found a piece of hand dyed wool that looked like a wonderful background for flowers, this led me to various colours of wool roving which I felted onto the wool in different sized circles.

I then took different colour threads and outlined each colour of flower using a different free motion movement on each colour of flower. I wanted to get more depth in the card so I stitched some machine flowers and some lazy daisy flowers on solvy which I then dissolved to get flowers to attach. I attached these flowers randomly and then added some french knots in clusters for smaller flowers. I was happy with this result so stopped before I messed it up!

Pat

Here is Pat’s interpretation of the May-June theme:

In Pat’s words:

I started by enlarging just a portion of the photo and then did a colour pencil sketch of it. From there I colour photocopied it on to an interfacing type material to use as a pattern for machine embroidery. I backed it with cotton and a stabalizer and went to work. There are approximately 25 different colours used to try to get the effect. I kept it tightly hooped the entire time but it still managed to warp. More to learn about machine work I guess. I enjoyed the overall sketching with the machine but I don’t think I’ll ever give up my love of handwork. Because of the area I choose to enlarge, the tulip ended up upside down. Perhaps a bit like my world these days.

I hope you enjoy the flowers as well.

Carol

Here is Carol’s interpretation of the May-June theme:

I could not decide what to do with the floral bouquet picture.  It lent itself to doing french or colonial knots, but I didn’t feel like doing those.  While I don’t really know how to needle tat, I thought that might work to make flowers.  I actually made 2 little tatted rings just before it was time to go on holidays.  Of course I took it all along with me pretending that I was going to accomplish something while on holidays.

So on my holiday, my daughter and I visited my sister-in-law.  She had to take a phone call while we were there, and then I saw it – her flowered paper towels.  I mentioned to my daughter that I wondered if I could stitch on it.  So I helped myself to a couple of pieces. My sister-in-law barely raised an eyebrow when I told her I was stealing her paper towels!

So with one of the pieces, I first tried dampening it to see if I could get it to bleed onto my white fabric, but that attempt didn’t work.

The procedure I used is that I fused the paper towel to my base fabric, and then fused organza over the top of the paper towel.  I then proceeded to stitch through all layers of fabric and paper towel.  The flowers, stems and leaves are stitched using chain, stem, whipped running and straight stitches.  The centres of the flowers are done with eyelets, beads and colonial knots, and I finished it off by adding a butterfly charm.

On the back of the postcard, I modified the wording of the Irish blessing:

May the road rise up to meet you.
May the wind always be at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face,
and rains fall soft upon your fields.
May your paper towel always be dry.

Experimenting and trying unusual techniques is one of the reasons I’ve enjoyed about being part of this postcard exchange group.  What other possible reason could I have for trying to stitch on a paper towel (other than an Artist Trading Card of course!!).

Joyce

Here is Joyce’ interpretation of the May-June theme:

In Joyce’s words:

I really enjoyed doing this card – once I got started!! i wanted to try some non-wired detached elements so I created some tulip petals and the lilac heads on organza. Then I painted their edges with Fray check and cut them out close to the stitching. I had planned to use Fabric Stiffener (Barbola technique) but the pieces were so tiny it wasn’t necessary. After I attached these pieces to the base of cotton Moiré on which I had stitched some leaves and stems, I added some more petals to the tulips and then some Forsythia to fill out the bouquet. Most of the bouquet is in variegated cottons and silks.

Eleanor

Here is Eleanor’s interpretation of the May-June theme:

In Eleanor’s words:

This picture was a totally gorgeous picture. The bouquet was great and I thought the background of the grey fence was stunning. So, I wanted to have a grey fence in the background of my interpretation.

I tried grey cotton fabric and Lutradur, which I painted, but both seemed too flat and not at all interesting. I figured then that I needed fabric with a definite texture. I painted beige shantung silk, I couldn’t find any grey, with Setacolor fabric paint and cut it into “boards”.

For the background I painted a cotton fabric with green paints and ironed my “fence boards” on the background using Misty Fuse®. I then created a flower garden using silk ribbon and rayon, cotton and silk floss. The edge was finished with a cord made from embroidery floss.

I was happy with the result and really enjoyed doing this postcard. However, because I was going through 2 layers (in some parts) of painted fabrics plus the stiffness of the Misty Fuse® fusing it took a bit more care than normal working with the silk ribbon. It was not too difficult, because the size of this piece was small, but I think I would avoid doing too large a piece with the number of layers I used.